uniformity of nature

The principle that the past will resemble the future, in that when sufficiently similar situations recur, similar effects follow. The principle seems to be presupposed in some form both by the reliance we put upon scientific prediction and by the certainties of everyday life. Its exact formulation and justification is the problem of induction . See also Hume, Goodman's paradox.

Philosophy dictionary. . 2011.

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  • uniformity of nature — a doctrine or principle of the invariability or regularity of nature; specifically : one that holds identical antecedent states or causes to be uniformly followed by identical effects called also principle of the uniformity of nature …   Useful english dictionary

  • principle of the uniformity of nature — see uniformity of nature …   Useful english dictionary

  • Uniformity — U ni*form i*ty, n. [L. uniformitas: cf. F. uniformit[ e].] 1. The quality or state of being uniform; freedom from variation or difference; resemblance to itself at all times; sameness of action, effect, etc., under like conditions; even tenor; as …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Act of Uniformity — Uniformity U ni*form i*ty, n. [L. uniformitas: cf. F. uniformit[ e].] 1. The quality or state of being uniform; freedom from variation or difference; resemblance to itself at all times; sameness of action, effect, etc., under like conditions;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Principle of uniformity — The principle of uniformity, or the The Principle of Uniformity of Nature , postulates that the laws of nature discovered on Earth apply throughout the universe. There are several variations and corollaries:* A stronger uniformity principle is… …   Wikipedia

  • causal uniformity, principle of — A combination of the principle of the uniformity of nature, with the view that the laws of nature are causal laws, prescribing which events have which effects. Russell held that the mathematical nature of the laws of modern physics shows that… …   Philosophy dictionary

  • Miracle — • In general, a wonderful thing, the word being so used in classical Latin; in a specific sense, the Latin Vulgate designates by miracula wonders of a peculiar kind, expressed more clearly in the Greek text by the terms terata, dynameis, semeia,… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Induction — • Induction is the conscious mental process by which we pass from the perception of particular phenomena (things and events) to the knowledge of general truths Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Induction     Induction …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Enlightenment (The Scottish) — The Scottish Enlightenment M.A.Stewart INTRODUCTION The term ‘Scottish Enlightenment’ is used to characterize a hundred years of intellectual and cultural endeavour that started around the second decade of the eighteenth century. Our knowledge of …   History of philosophy

  • Philosophy — For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation) …   Wikipedia

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