four-term fallacy
The fallacy committed when the middle term of a syllogism has a different sense in each premise (i.e. the syllogism really has four terms instead of the necessary three). For example: ‘All men are wolves, all wolves live in the arctic, therefore all men live in the arctic.’

Philosophy dictionary. . 2011.

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