common sense
In early modern writing (e.g. Descartes ) the faculty responsible for coordinating the deliveries of the different senses. In this meaning the objects of common sense are the ‘common sensibles’, i.e. qualities such as extension and motion that can be detected by more than one sense. Later the term loses any special meaning, coming to refer just to the sturdy good judgement, uncontaminated by too much theory and unmoved by scepticism, that is supposed to belong to persons before they become too philosophical. Ryle once suggested that Locke invented common sense, and Russell added that none but Englishmen have had it ever since. The term became prominent in philosophy after Moore argued in ‘A Defence of Common Sense’ that no philosophical argument purporting to establish scepticism could be more certain than his common-sense convictions. Moore's knowledge that he had a hand was more certain than any philosophical premises or trains of argument purporting to show that he did not know this.

Philosophy dictionary. . 2011.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Common sense — Common Com mon, a. [Compar. {Commoner}; superl. {Commonest}.] [OE. commun, comon, OF. comun, F. commun, fr. L. communis; com + munis ready to be of service; cf. Skr. mi to make fast, set up, build, Goth. gamains common, G. gemein, and E. mean low …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Common sense — Sense Sense, n. [L. sensus, from sentire, sensum, to perceive, to feel, from the same root as E. send; cf. OHG. sin sense, mind, sinnan to go, to journey, G. sinnen to meditate, to think: cf. F. sens. For the change of meaning cf. {See}, v. t.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • common sense — noun uncount * the ability to use good judgment and make sensible decisions: Let s use a little common sense here. a. only before noun using or involving common sense: a common sense approach to the problem …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • common sense — n [U] the ability to behave in a sensible way and make practical decisions ▪ Use your common sense for once! ▪ a common sense approach to education …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • common sense — n. ordinary good sense or sound practical judgment common sense adj. common sensical [käm′ən sen′si kəl] …   English World dictionary

  • Common sense — Com mon sense See {Common sense}, under {Sense} …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • common sense — I noun acumen, astuteness, balanced judgment, calmness, clear thinking, composure, experience, experienced view, good judgment, good sense, intelligence, intuition, judgment, level headedness, logic, mental poise, native reason, natural sagacity …   Law dictionary

  • common sense — [n] good reasoning acumen, cool, good sense, gumption, horse sense*, intelligence, levelheadedness, practicality, prudence, reasonableness, sense, sound judgment, soundness, wisdom, wit; concept 409 Ant. foolishness, impracticality, insanity,… …   New thesaurus

  • COMMON SENSE —         (англ.) здравый смысл. Философский энциклопедический словарь. М.: Советская энциклопедия. Гл. редакция: Л. Ф. Ильичёв, П. Н. Федосеев, С. М. Ковалёв, В. Г. Панов. 1983. COMMON SENSE …   Философская энциклопедия

  • common sense — 14c., originally the power of uniting mentally the impressions conveyed by the five physical senses, thus ordinary understanding, without which one is foolish or insane (L. sensus communis, Gk. koine aisthesis); meaning good sense is from 1726.… …   Etymology dictionary

  • common sense — ► NOUN ▪ good sense and sound judgement in practical matters …   English terms dictionary

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