St Petersburg paradox
Paradox in the theory of probability published by Daniel Bernoulli in 1730 in the Commentarii of the St Petersburg academy. Someone offers you the following opportunity: he will toss a fair coin. If it comes up heads on the first toss he will pay you one dollar; if heads does not appear until the second throw, two dollars, and so on, doubling your winnings each time heads fails to appear on another toss. The game continues until heads is first thrown, when it stops. What is a fair amount for you to pay for this opportunity? The incredible reply is: an infinite amount. For your expectation of gain is given by the series ½ + (2 × 1/4) + (4 × 1/8) +…, which has an infinite sum. This little offer is apparently worth more to you than all the wealth in the world. Yet nobody in their right mind would pay much at all for it. The paradox has been taken to show the incoherence of allowing infinite utilities into decision theory. Once they are allowed, then it is worth staking any finite sum on any indefinitely small chance of an infinite payoff. If it is specified that the St Petersburg game has to stop when, for example, the payoff reaches the size of the National Debt, then the calculation of what you should pay to enter the game remains quite reasonable: if the National debt is, say 2n dollars, you should pay ½n dollars and no more to enter the game.

Philosophy dictionary. . 2011.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • St. Petersburg paradox — In economics, the St. Petersburg paradox is a paradox related to probability theory and decision theory. It is based on a particular (theoretical) lottery game (sometimes called St. Petersburg Lottery ) that leads to a random variable with… …   Wikipedia

  • Paradox — Ein Paradoxon oder Paradox (altgriechisch παράδοξον, von παρα , para – gegen und δόξα, dóxa – Meinung, Ansicht), auch Paradoxie (παραδοξία) und in der Mehrzahl Paradoxa g …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Sankt-Petersburg-Lotterie — Das Sankt Petersburg Paradoxon (oft auch Sankt Petersburg Lotterie) beschreibt ein Paradoxon in einem Glücksspiel. Die Zufallsvariable hat hier einen unendlichen Erwartungswert, was gleichbedeutend mit einer unendlich großen erwarteten Auszahlung …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • St.-Petersburg-Paradoxon — Das Sankt Petersburg Paradoxon (oft auch Sankt Petersburg Lotterie) beschreibt ein Paradoxon in einem Glücksspiel. Die Zufallsvariable hat hier einen unendlichen Erwartungswert, was gleichbedeutend mit einer unendlich großen erwarteten Auszahlung …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • St.-Petersburg-Spiel — Das Sankt Petersburg Paradoxon (oft auch Sankt Petersburg Lotterie) beschreibt ein Paradoxon in einem Glücksspiel. Die Zufallsvariable hat hier einen unendlichen Erwartungswert, was gleichbedeutend mit einer unendlich großen erwarteten Auszahlung …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Sankt-Petersburg-Paradoxon — Das Sankt Petersburg Paradoxon (oft auch Sankt Petersburg Lotterie) beschreibt ein Paradoxon in einem Glücksspiel. Die Zufallsvariable hat hier einen unendlichen Erwartungswert, was gleichbedeutend mit einer unendlich großen erwarteten Auszahlung …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Allais paradox — The Allais paradox is a choice problem designed by Maurice Allais to show an inconsistency of actual observed choices with the predictions of expected utility theory. Contents 1 Statement of the Problem 2 Mathematical proof of inconsistency 2.1… …   Wikipedia

  • Saint Petersburg (disambiguation) — Saint Petersburg is the second largest city in Russia.Saint Petersburg may also refer to the following places in the United States of America: *St. Petersburg, Florida *St. Petersburg, Pennsylvania *St. Petersburg, Missouri mdash;the fictional… …   Wikipedia

  • Ellsberg-Paradox — Das Ellsberg Paradoxon ist ein aus der Entscheidungstheorie bekanntes Phänomen der Entscheidung unter Unsicherheit. Wenn Menschen sich zwischen zwei Optionen entscheiden müssen, und nur bei einer Option die Wahrscheinlichkeitsverteilung bekannt… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Two envelopes problem — The two envelopes problem is a puzzle or paradox within the subjectivistic interpretation of probability theory; more specifically within Bayesian decision theory. This is still an open problem among the subjectivists as no consensus has been… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”