rhetoric
The art of using language so as to persuade or influence others. Although rhetoric is apparently opposed to the philosophical ideal of the exact pursuit of truth, their reconciliation has sometimes seemed desirable, most notably to Cicero . If one thinks of philosophy as a matter of argument rather than doctrine, as the academic sceptics did, then rhetoric is good practice in argument. The cultivation of this art was an important study in medieval universities, and began to regain ground with the belief, widely shared in the late 20th century, that all discourse and argument contains a political and persuasive core. See also postmodernism.

Philosophy dictionary. . 2011.

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  • Rhetoric — Rhet o*ric, n. [F. rh[ e]torique, L. rhetorica, Gr. ???? (sc. ???), fr. ??? rhetorical, oratorical, fr. ??? orator, rhetorician; perhaps akin to E. word; cf. ??? to say.] 1. The art of composition; especially, elegant composition in prose. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rhetoric — ► NOUN 1) the art of effective or persuasive speaking or writing. 2) language with a persuasive or impressive effect, but often lacking sincerity or meaningful content. ORIGIN from Greek rh torik tekhn art of rhetoric …   English terms dictionary

  • rhetoric — I (insincere language) noun affectation, artificial eloquence, bombastic speech, declamation, euphuism, grandiloquence, grandiosity, inflated language, loftiness, magniloquence, pomposity, pompous speech, pompousness, pretension, pretentiousness… …   Law dictionary

  • rhetoric — (n.) c.1300, from O.Fr. rethorique, from L. rhetorice, from Gk. rhetorike techne art of an orator, from rhetor (gen. rhetoros) orator, related to rhema word, lit. that which is spoken, from PIE *wre tor , from root *were to speak (Cf. O.E …   Etymology dictionary

  • rhetoric — [n] wordiness; long speech address, balderdash*, big talk*, bombast, composition, discourse, elocution, eloquence, flowery language, fustian, grandiloquence, hot air*, hyperbole, magniloquence, oration, oratory, pomposity, rant, verbosity;… …   New thesaurus

  • rhetoric — [ret′ər ik] n. [ME rethorike < OFr or L: OFr rethorique < L rhetorica < Gr rhētorikē (technē), rhetorical (art) < rhētōr, orator: see RHETOR] 1. a) the art of using words effectively in speaking or writing; esp., now, the art of prose …   English World dictionary

  • Rhetoric — This article is about the art of rhetoric in general. For the work by Aristotle, see Rhetoric (Aristotle). Painting depicting a lecture in a knight academy, painted by Pieter Isaacsz or Reinhold Timm for Rosenborg Castle as part of a series of… …   Wikipedia

  • rhetoric — /ret euhr ik/, n. 1. (in writing or speech) the undue use of exaggeration or display; bombast. 2. the art or science of all specialized literary uses of language in prose or verse, including the figures of speech. 3. the study of the effective… …   Universalium

  • rhetoric — noun 1) a form of rhetoric Syn: oratory, eloquence, command of language, way with words 2) empty rhetoric Syn: bombast, turgidity, grandiloquence, magniloquence, pomposity, extravagant language, purple prose; …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • rhetoric — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ empty, mere ▪ Her speech was just empty rhetoric. ▪ fiery, inflammatory, powerful, radical ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

  • rhetoric — rhet|o|ric [ retərık ] noun uncount * a style of speaking or writing that is intended to influence people: angry nationalist rhetoric anti American rhetoric the rhetoric of freedom/reform/law and order a. a style of speaking or writing that is… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

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