accident, fallacy of the

Philosophy dictionary. . 2011.

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  • Fallacy of the single cause — The fallacy of the single cause, also known as causal oversimplification, is a fallacy of questionable cause that occurs when it is assumed that there is a single, simple cause of an outcome when in reality it may have been caused by a number of… …   Wikipedia

  • converse fallacy of the accident — See a dicto secundum quid ad dictum simpliciter …   Philosophy dictionary

  • Accident (fallacy) — The logical fallacy of accident, also called destroying the exception or a dicto simpliciter ad dictum secundum quid, is a deductive fallacy occurring in statistical syllogisms (an argument based on a generalization) when an exception to the… …   Wikipedia

  • Fallacy of composition — The fallacy of composition arises when one infers that something is true of the whole from the fact that it is true of some part of the whole (or even of every proper part). For example: This fragment of metal cannot be broken with a hammer,… …   Wikipedia

  • Fallacy of quoting out of context — The practice of quoting out of context, sometimes referred to as contextomy or quote mining , is a logical fallacy and a type of false attribution in which a passage is removed from its surrounding matter in such a way as to distort its intended… …   Wikipedia

  • Fallacy of division — A fallacy of division occurs when one reasons logically that something true of a thing must also be true of all or some of its parts. An example: A Boeing 747 can fly unaided across the ocean. A Boeing 747 has jet engines. Therefore, one of its… …   Wikipedia

  • fallacy of accident — the fallacy that consists in arguing from some accidental character as if it were essential or necessary (as in the food you buy you eat; you buy raw meat; therefore you eat raw meat) …   Useful english dictionary

  • Parable of the broken window — The parable of the broken window was created by Frédéric Bastiat in his 1850 essay fr. Ce qu on voit et ce qu on ne voit pas ( That Which Is Seen and That Which Is Unseen ) to illuminate the notion of hidden costs.Bastiat uses this story to… …   Wikipedia

  • fallacy — /fal euh see/, n., pl. fallacies. 1. a deceptive, misleading, or false notion, belief, etc.: That the world is flat was at one time a popular fallacy. 2. a misleading or unsound argument. 3. deceptive, misleading, or false nature; erroneousness.… …   Universalium

  • The Mythical Man-Month —   …   Wikipedia

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