predicate
A predicate is any expression that is capable of connecting with one or more singular terms to make a sentence. A predicate expresses a condition that the entities referred to may satisfy, in which case the resulting sentence will be true. For this reason a predicate may be thought of as a function from things to sentences or even to truth-values. Although modern logic makes a sharp distinction between predicates and terms that stand for things, traditional logic did not. In the theory of the syllogism the subject and predicate terms are thought of as grammatically interchangeable, as ‘All A is B, all B is C, so all A is C’, where the term B is a predicate on its first occurrence, but thought of as a subject on the next. The modern treatment denies that such a form is subject–predicate at all, but sees it as a quantification, involving two predicates: (∀x )A x → B x . The letters A, B…, or more usually F, G…, are predicate letters, standing where predicates would stand in sentences when we are considering the logical form of arguments.

Philosophy dictionary. . 2011.

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  • Predicate — Pred i*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Predicated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Predicating}.] [L. praedicatus, p. p. of praedicare to cry in public, to proclaim. See {Preach}.] 1. To assert to belong to something; to affirm (one thing of another); as, to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Predicate — or predication may refer to:*Predicate (mathematics), a relation, or the boolean valued characteristic function or indicator function of a relation *Predicate (logic), a fundamental concept in first order logic **in Bertrand Russell s theory of… …   Wikipedia

  • predicate — [pred′i kāt΄; ] for n. [ & ] adj. [, pred′ikit] vt. predicated, predicating [L praedicatus, pp. of praedicare: see PREACH] 1. Obs. to proclaim; preach; declare; affirm 2. a) to affirm as a quality, attribute, or property of a person or thing …   English World dictionary

  • predicate — pred·i·cate 1 / pre də ˌkāt/ vt cat·ed, cat·ing: to set or ground on something: find a basis for usu. used with on if Mary s claim is predicated simply on John s duty of support W. M. McGovern, Jr. et al. pred·i·cate 2 / pre di kət/ adj: rela …   Law dictionary

  • Predicate — Pred i*cate, n. [L. praedicatum, neut. of praedicatus, p. p. praedicare: cf. F. pr[ e]dicat. See {Predicate}, v. t.] 1. (Logic) That which is affirmed or denied of the subject. In these propositions, Paper is white, Ink is not white, whiteness is …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • predicate — and predict are distantly related but their meanings are distinct. The primary meaning of predict is ‘to foretell’, whereas the primary use of predicate is followed by on in the meaning ‘to found or base (on a principle or assumption)’: That s a… …   Modern English usage

  • predicate — ► NOUN 1) Grammar the part of a sentence or clause containing a verb and stating something about the subject (e.g. went home in John went home). 2) Logic something which is affirmed or denied concerning an argument of a proposition. ► VERB 1)… …   English terms dictionary

  • Predicate — Pred i*cate, a. [L. praedicatus, p. p.] Predicated. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Predicate — Pred i*cate, v. i. To affirm something of another thing; to make an affirmation. Sir M. Hale. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • predicate — (n.) 1530s, a term in logic, from L. praedicatum that which is said of the subject, properly neut. pp. of praedicare assert, proclaim, declare publicly, from prae forth, before (see PRE (Cf. pre )) + dicare proclaim, from stem of dicere to speak …   Etymology dictionary

  • predicate — vb affirm, declare, profess, *assert, aver, protest, avouch, avow, warrant …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

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