naturalistic fallacy
Alleged fallacy, identified by Moore in Principia Ethica (1903), of identifying an ethical concept with a ‘natural’ concept, or description of the features of things in virtue of which they are supposed good or bad. Thus if one's standard is utilitarian, to say that some action is good will mean the very same as saying that it creates more happiness than rival actions would. This equation of meaning is almost certainly wrong, but subsequent work has not confirmed that Moore's opponents, particularly J. S. Mill, made the identification or committed any error of reasoning based on it. See also open question argument.

Philosophy dictionary. . 2011.

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  • naturalistic fallacy — Fallacy of treating the term good (or any equivalent term) as if it were the name of a natural property. In 1903 G.E. Moore presented in Principia Ethica his open question argument against what he called the naturalistic fallacy, with the aim of… …   Universalium

  • Naturalistic fallacy — The naturalistic fallacy is often claimed to be a formal fallacy. It was described and named by British philosopher G. E. Moore in his 1903 book Principia Ethica. Moore stated that a naturalistic fallacy is committed whenever a philosopher… …   Wikipedia

  • naturalistic fallacy — noun Any attempt to verbally define good , instead of treating it as an undefined term, in terms of which other terms are defined. See Also: is ought problem …   Wiktionary

  • naturalistic fallacy — noun : the process of defining ethical terms (as the good) in nonethical descriptive terms (as happiness, pleasure, and utility) …   Useful english dictionary

  • fallacy — fallacy, sophism, sophistry, casuistry are comparable when meaning unsound and misleading reasoning or line of argument. The same distinctions in implications and connotations are distinguishable in the corresponding adjectives fallacious,… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Fallacy — In logic and rhetoric, a fallacy is usually incorrect argumentation in reasoning resulting in a misconception or presumption. By accident or design, fallacies may exploit emotional triggers in the listener or interlocutor (appeal to emotion), or… …   Wikipedia

  • Definist fallacy — The definist fallacy can refer to three logical fallacies related to how terms are defined in an argument. The first, coined by William Frankena in 1939, involves the definition of one property in terms of another. The second fallacy refers to… …   Wikipedia

  • Moralistic fallacy — The moralistic fallacy is in essence the reverse of the naturalistic fallacy. Naturalistic fallacy presumes that what is or what occurs forms what ought to be. Thus the observed natural is reasoned a priori as moral.[1] Moralistic fallacy implies …   Wikipedia

  • Deductive fallacy — A deductive fallacy is defined as a deductive argument that is invalid. The argument itself could have true premises, but still have a false conclusion.[1] Thus, a deductive fallacy is a fallacy where deduction goes wrong, and is no longer a… …   Wikipedia

  • Base rate fallacy — The base rate fallacy, also called base rate neglect or base rate bias, is an error that occurs when the conditional probability of some hypothesis H given some evidence E is assessed without taking into account the base rate or prior probability …   Wikipedia

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