intention
To have an intention is to be in a state of mind that is favourably directed towards bringing about (or maintaining, or avoiding) some state of affairs. The notion thus inherits all the problems of intentionality . The specific problems it raises include characterizing the difference between doing something accidentally and doing it intentionally. The suggestion that the difference lies in a preceding act of mind or volition is not very happy, since one may automatically do what is nevertheless intentional, for example putting one's foot forward while walking. Conversely, unless the formation of a volition is intentional, and thus raises the same questions, the presence of a volition might be unintentional or beyond one's control. Intentions are more finely grained than movements: one set of movements may both be answering the question and starting a war, yet the one may be intentional and the other not.

Philosophy dictionary. . 2011.

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  • intention — [ ɛ̃tɑ̃sjɔ̃ ] n. f. • 1190; lat. intentio 1 ♦ Fait de se proposer un certain but. ⇒ dessein, idée, projet. Intention et action, et passage à l acte. ♢ Dr. Volonté consciente de commettre un fait prohibé par la loi. Commettre un acte avec l… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Intention — • An act of the will by which that faculty efficaciously desires to reach an end by employing the means Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Intention     Intention      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • intention — INTENTION. s. f. Dessein, mouvement de l ame par lequel on tend, on vise à quelque fin. Bonne intention. mauvaise intention. droite, loüable intention. il a intention, l intention de faire quelque chose. mon intention n estoit pas de vous… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • intention — in·ten·tion /in ten chən/ n: something intended: intent the intention of the testator ◇ Intent is more commonly used than intention when speaking technically esp. about the criminal and tort concepts of intent (senses 1a and 1b). Merriam… …   Law dictionary

  • Intention — In*ten tion, n. [F. intention, L. intentio. See {Intend}, and cf. {Intension}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A stretching or bending of the mind toward an object; closeness of application; fixedness of attention; earnestness. [1913 Webster] Intention is… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intention — intention, intent, purpose, design, aim, end, object, objective, goal are comparable when meaning what one proposes to accomplish or to attain by doing or making something, in distinction from what prompts one (the motive), or from the activity… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • intention — is followed either by of + verbal noun or by a to infinitive, the first of these being somewhat more common and the second influenced by the verb intend: • I have no intention no present intention of standing for Parliament Harold Macmillan, 1979 …   Modern English usage

  • Intention — Sf Absicht, Bestreben per. Wortschatz fremd. Erkennbar fremd (16. Jh.) Entlehnung. Entlehnt aus l. intentio ( ōnis), einem Abstraktum zu l. intendere (intentum) hinwenden, anschicken, sein Streben auf etwas richten , zu l. tendere (tentum,… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • intention — [in ten′shən] n. [ME entencioun < OFr entencion < L intentio < pp. of intendere] 1. the act or fact of intending; determination to do a specified thing or act in a specified manner 2. a) anything intended or planned; aim, end, or purpose …   English World dictionary

  • Intention — (v. lat.), Absicht, Zweck; daher Intentioniren, beabsichtigen. Intentionalismus, Glaube, daß der Zweck (Intention) die Mittel heilige. Intentionalität, Absichtlichkeit …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Intention — (lat.), Absicht, Vorhaben, Zweck (nicht zu verwechseln mit Intension, s. d.) …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

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