infinite divisibility

Philosophy dictionary. . 2011.

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  • Infinite divisibility — The concept of infinite divisibility arises in different ways in philosophy, physics, economics, order theory (a branch of mathematics), and probability theory (also a branch of mathematics). One may speak of infinite divisibility, or the lack… …   Wikipedia

  • Infinite divisibility (probability) — In probability theory, to say that a probability distribution F on the real line is infinitely divisible means that if X is any random variable whose distribution is F , then for every positive integer n there exist n independent identically… …   Wikipedia

  • Extension (metaphysics) — In metaphysics, extension is, roughly speaking, the property of taking up space . René Descartes defines extension as the property of existing in more than one dimension. For Descartes, the primary characteristic of matter is extension, just as… …   Wikipedia

  • Leibniz: truth, knowledge and metaphysics — Nicholas Jolley Leibniz is in important respects the exception among the great philosophers of the seventeenth century. The major thinkers of the period characteristically proclaim the need to reject the philosophical tradition; in their… …   History of philosophy

  • List of mathematics articles (I) — NOTOC Ia IA automorphism ICER Icosagon Icosahedral 120 cell Icosahedral prism Icosahedral symmetry Icosahedron Icosian Calculus Icosian game Icosidodecadodecahedron Icosidodecahedron Icositetrachoric honeycomb Icositruncated dodecadodecahedron… …   Wikipedia

  • atomism — atomist, n. atomistic, atomistical, adj. atomistically, adv. /at euh miz euhm/, n. 1. Also called atomic theory. Philos. the theory that minute, discrete, finite, and indivisible elements are the ultimate constituents of all matter. 2. Psychol. a …   Universalium

  • Indecomposable distribution — In probability theory, an indecomposable distribution is a probability distribution that cannot be represented as the distribution of the sum of two or more non constant independent random variables: Z ≠ X + Y. If it can be so …   Wikipedia

  • Euclidean geometry — A Greek mathematician performing a geometric construction with a compass, from The School of Athens by Raphael. Euclidean geometry is a mathematical system attributed to the Alexandrian Greek mathematician Euclid, which he described in his… …   Wikipedia

  • Logic and the philosophy of mathematics in the nineteenth century — John Stillwell INTRODUCTION In its history of over two thousand years, mathematics has seldom been disturbed by philosophical disputes. Ever since Plato, who is said to have put the slogan ‘Let no one who is not a geometer enter here’ over the… …   History of philosophy

  • Supertask — In philosophy, a supertask is a task occurring within a finite interval of time involving infinitely many steps (subtasks). A hypertask is a supertask with an uncountable number of subtasks. The term supertask was coined by the philosopher James… …   Wikipedia

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